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Efficiency: The First Fuel

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    Smart lighting and the makeover of LED driver ICs

    By Majeed Ahmad | February 7, 2017

    LED driver ICs such as Fairchild’s FL77944 accommodate higher wattage systems like street lights using parallel connections with LEDs.

    American Airlines Center near the Dallas downtown recently replaced the high-pressure sodium and metal halide light fixtures with LED luminaires in its parking garages. And that has allowed the sports and entertainment arena to reduce an estimated 60 percent energy consumption and $1.26 million in total lifetime savings in parking garage lighting.

    Efficiency: The First Fuel

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      Guest Blog : How the IoT — and the smartphone — are enabling the smart home

      January 23, 2017

       

       

       

      A smart home in San Diego, California combines the best of modern architecture with the best in smart home technology.

      By Ajinder Singh

      Providing a comfortable space for its occupants is only the minimum requirement for a habitable building, whether it be a primitive shelter, or modern steel and glass structure.

      A building should be more than just a “container” for its occupants.

      Efficiency: The First Fuel

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        Edison’s revenge? Why DC-only distribution makes sense for energy savings

        By Patrick Mannion | January 2, 2017

        The drive for energy conservation, the DC basis of modern electronic systems, and the development of renewable energy sources have converged to challenge the 100-year-old assumption that AC alone is the single best means of distributing electricity.

        Instead, a combination of AC for the main grid and DC for micro and nano grids is shaping up to be a more energy-efficient path, if industries and engineers come together to define the necessary standards and implement them effectively.

        Efficiency: The First Fuel

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          The rise of energy-efficient microcontrollers

          By Majeed Ahmad | January 2, 2017

          The humble microcontroller — also the workhorse of embedded design — has long been battling the dilemma of how to raise the performance bar while conserving energy. A new generation of MCUs is finally turning a corner on energy-efficiency challenges while offering greater processing horsepower for high-end embedded designs.

          Case in point is ST Micro’s STM32H743 microcontroller that boasts the ARM® Cortex®-M7 core running at 400MHz.

          Efficiency: The First Fuel

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            Solar inverter: Before and after GaN

            The inherent low switching losses of the GaN power stage make it possible to reach efficiencies of 99% and higher. Higher efficiencies mean smaller heat sinks and less need for cooling, and facilitate designs that are more compact and very cost-effective

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            Rethink your solar inverter with GaN – On the Grid – Blogs – TI E2E Community

             

            Solar inverter: Before and after GaN

            “PG&E has called a SmartDay event for Thursday, 07/28/2016 for your residence.

            Efficiency: The First Fuel

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              How engineers can stop climate change in its tracks

               

              ei

              In December 2015, after two decades of negotiations, 195 countries adopted a historic, legally binding agreement on climate change. The primary goal of the so-called Paris agreement is to hold the increase in global average temperature “to well below 2°C,” and “to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels, recognizing that this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change.”

              The agreement still needs to be approved by the individual governments of the countries involved.